300px-Boeing_787_first_flight

300px-Boeing_787_first_flight

5 Comments

  1. Bear on September 10, 2011 at 9:53 am

    Haha. I woke up down today. You’ve cheeerd me up!



  2. Jimbo on September 11, 2011 at 11:14 am

    With all these silly websites, such a great page keeps my inertnet hope alive.



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  4. Rose on October 3, 2014 at 6:12 am

    There is absolutely no chacne that the 787 will fly in April. The gauntlet testing will take about two months alone and that’s assuming that major problems are not revealed in the gauntlet testing.1) Most challenging part of the flight test-All of it is challenging. This is all new technology that is being tested not just an airplane.2) Gauntlet test is testing of all the airplane systems teogether as if it is in flight but it’s done on the ground. They want to make sure that the entire airplane system is integrated the way the engineers had designed it.3)There would have to be major issues that are revealed to do that. For example Boeing found that the center wing box was buckling so they had to strengthen it. They found this out while testing the wing box but that helped contribute to the 2 year delay. It would have to be something of that magnitude or even if they found incorrectly installed fasteners like they did, then the rework would take time. If they find minor issues which can be easily corrected on all the airplanes that have been assembled all they way back up the supply chain, then it won’t be a show stopper as they have a plan to integrate those changes back up the supply chain.4) All the airplanes will be flown by Boeing before delivery. Boeing and all airplane manufacturers test every airplane they assemble to make sure that it was done correctly and that there are no issues. It would be a standard test flying which takes about 2 to 3 weeks.



  5. admin on November 13, 2014 at 7:51 pm

    Rose, the dreamliner is already flying and it went out a Little bit late but there are quiet a few in service.



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